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Tuesday, May 30, 2017

May 2017: Tour of My Garden

1. Hops

The soil where you plant the hops should be tilled to create a weed-free area and be worked into a friable condition. In cold climates, you can plant rhizomes in pots and transplant them in June. Hops prefer full sun and rich soil, preferably light textured and well-drained with a pH of 6.5–8.0.

https://byo.com/hops/item/728-growing-hops-tips-from-the-pros


2. Asparagus

Asparagus is planted in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. The plant is grown from “crowns” (1-year-old plants). Eliminate all weeds from the bed, digging it over and working in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost, manure or soil mix. Dig trenches of about 6 inches wide and 6 to 12 inches deep.

http://www.almanac.com/plant/asparagus


3. Potato Plant
To begin with, dig a trench that is 6-8 inches deep. Plant each piece of potato (cut side down, with the eyes pointing up) every 12-15 inches, with the rows spaced 3 feet apart. If your space is limited or if you would like to grow only baby potatoes, you can decrease the spacing between plants.

http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/tips-for-growing-potatoes

4. Grapes
Make sure your seeds stay warm enough. To properly germinate, the seeds need daytime temperatures of at least 70ºF (20ºC) and nighttime temperatures around 60ºF (15ºC). Use a greenhouse or warming mats to keep your seeds at the correct temperature. Keep the soil moist but not too wet.
http://m.wikihow.com/Grow-Grapes-from-Seeds

5. Squash

Squash plants are heavy feeders. Work compost and plenty of organic matter into the soil before planting for a rich soil base. To germinate outside, use cloche or frame protection in cold climates for the first few weeks. Plant seeds about one-inch deep and 2 to 3 feet apart in a traditional garden bed.
http://www.almanac.com/plant/squash-and-zucchini

6. Blueberries
Blueberries prefer acidic soils. A fail-safe way to grow blueberries in almost any soil is to incorporate peat moss into the planting medium. For planting directly in the ground, work up a planting area approximately 2½ feet in diameter and 1 foot deep for each plant.
http://www.fallcreeknursery.com/home-gardeners/how-to-grow

7. Lettuce

Before maturity, you can harvest leaf lettuce by simply removing outer leaves so that the center leaves can continue to grow.Butterhead or romaine types can be harvested by removing the outer leaves, digging up the whole plant or cutting the plant about an inch above the soil surface.
www.almanac.com/plant/lettuce

8. Garlic

In areas that get a hard frost, plant garlic 6 to 8 weeks before that frost date. In southern areas, February or March is a better time to plant. Break apart cloves from bulb a few days before planting, but keep the papery husk on each individual clove. Plant cloves about one month before the ground freezes.

www.almanac.com/plant/garlic

9. Onions
Leave them exposed. You can harvest young onions just a few weeks after planting if you want to use them as “spring onions” or scallions. There is no perfect size, just pull when they are big enough to suit you. For full-sized bulbs, let onions grow and mature.
https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-onions/

10. Myer Lemon Tree
Start with a healthy tree, grafted onto a hardy rootstock. Seed grown trees are often unhealthy and may not reach the point of flowering or producing fruit. Soil conditions when growing these lemons should be well-draining; however, the soil must hold enough water to remain moist.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/lemons/growing-meyer-lemons.htm

11. Radishes


  • Plant 4-6 weeks before the average date of the last frost, after aged manure or organic fertilizer has been worked into the soil.
  • Directly sow seeds ½ inch to an inch deep and one inch apart in rows 12 inches apart.
  • After they have sprouted, thin to about 2-inch spacings. Crowded plants will not grow well.
  • Radishes need the sun. If they are planted in too much shade—or even where neighboring vegetable plants shade them—they put all their energy into producing larger leaves.
  • Practice three-year crop rotation.
  • Plant consecutively every two weeks or so while the weather is still cool for a continuous harvest of radishes.
  • Plan on a fall planting. You can plant radishes later than any other root crop in late summer or early fall
http://www.almanac.com/plant/radishes

12. Ghost Peppers
Seeds for ghost peppers take around 35 days to germinate in very warm soil between 80-90 F. (27-32 C.) while keeping the soil moist consistently. Soak the seeds in hydrogen peroxide for a minute to increase germination success, and use full sun fluorescent light bulbs to maintain temperature and humidity.

13. Ginger
The easiest way to get started growing ginger root is to get a few fresh rhizomes of someone who does grow ginger, at the time when the plant re-shoots anyway (early spring). Otherwise just buy some at the shops at that time.

http://www.tropicalpermaculture.com/growing-ginger.html

14. Cherries


  • Plant cherries in the late fall or early spring (when the ground is soft and has a higher moisture content).
  • For sweet cherries, make sure the different varieties will pollinate each other.
  • Plant in a sunny site with good air circulation; avoid planting near trees or buildings that shade.
  • Cherry trees need deep, well-drained soil. 
  • Space sweet cherries 35 to 40 feet apart; dwarfs, 5 to 10 feet apart.
  • Space tart cherries 20 to 25 feet apart; dwarfs, 8 to 10 feet apart.
  • Set trees on standard rootstocks with the graft union a few inches below the soil level. Set trees on dwarf rootstock with the graft union several inches above the soil level.
  • When planting fan-trained trees, construct the necessary supports before planting. Plant fans only 12 to 15 feet apart.
  • For bare root trees, place the rootstock on a small mound of soil in the center of the planting hole, and spread the roots down and away, trying not to bend the roots. Backfill with soil.
  • For container-grown trees, first, remove the rootball and on its side; cut through the roots with shears. Don’t cover the top of the root-ball.

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